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Tambopata

Two one hectare permanent plots, one on Ultisol and one on Oxisol soils, were established in lowland Amazonia, Tambopata Biosphere Reserve, Tambopata Province, Department of Madre de Dios, Peru, in 2004.

In 2005, the team embarked on high-intensity measurement campaign to monitor above- and below-ground ecosystem productivity using the RAINFOR methodological framework.

The work carried out on these plots will result in the first published work on the carbon cycle of two lowland tropical forests in Western Amazonia, the first time a detailed carbon cycle study has been reported for this region.

We monitor the components of net primary productivity (NPP), autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration (Ra and Rh). We estimate gross primary productivity (as the sum of NPP and Ra) and carbon-use efficiency (the ratio NPP/GPP). These sites are representative of the high dynamism, low biomass sites of western Amazonia, although both sites are relatively fertile compared to the infertile central and eastern Amazonia sites where carbon studies have previously focussed.

Felix Filio Farfan Amezquita is responsible for data collection and analysis at the site.

Partners: Norma Salinas at UNSAAC, Nigel Pitman at WFU.

[note: link the following papers to this site:
Soil descriptions and profiles of both sites are given in Quesada et al., 2011.
The NPP of these plots, from a shorter two-year time series, has previously been reported in the multisite comparsion of NPP by Aragao et al (2009).]

Where are we working?

Bullet_red - Site Bullet_blue - Plot Bullet_yellow - Field station

Photos and images

Medium_nature
Uploaded 6 Feb 2014 by Cécile Girardin. Copyright © 2017.

Congratulations to the GEM team (Chris, Yadvinder & Liana) who co-authored a paper in Nature this week (cover story):

"The paper answers a long-standing question about the net carbon balance of the Amazon forest. It uses aircraft flights throughout the year at four different locations to measure the change in carbon dioxide concentration if air as it passes over the Amazon Basin. The study shows that in wet years and wet seasons the Amazon is a net sink (i.e. absorbs carbon) from the atmosphere, but in dry years and dry seasons it is carbon neutral or a source of carbon. Our main contribution in Oxford was to provide insight from our RAINFOR-GEM intensive monitoring plots across Amazonia, which suggest that the loss of the carbon sink was caused by a reduction in photosynthesis." (Y. Malhi blog, Feb 2014)

Gatti L.V., M. Gloor, J. B. Miller, C. E. Doughty, Y. Malhi, L. G. Domingues, L. S. Basso, A. Martinewski, C. S. C. Correia, V. F. Borges, S. Freitas, R. Braz, L. O. Anderson, H. Rocha, J. Grace, O. L. Phillips & J. Lloyd Drought sensitivity of Amazonian carbon balance revealed by atmospheric measurements, Nature 506, 76–80. Supplementary Info

Download the paper from here: http://is.gd/WZmcSs

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Latest news

Older news

  • Walter Huaraca HuascoAlexander ShenkinWayqechaSan PedroTerrestrial LiDAR in the AndesTambopata

    Presentation about terrestrial LiDAR and its potential use in the Tropical Forest.
    Presentation given on Jan 28th 2014. OUCE, Oxford.

    Report_word
  • Soil respirationTambopata

    Hi Darcy and the Tambopata team. Great work and thank you for the pictures.
    Just one comment: your soil respiration collars appear to be quite high above the ground. They could probably be half that height above the ground. Making the collars lower reduces the air space volume, and therefore increases the sensitivity of the CO2 flux measurement.
    No need to change the collars now they are installed, but in future it is good to remember this (the same goes for all the other GEM sites). Keep up the great work and I look forward to visiting Tambopata in August!

  • TambopataSan PedroWayqechaKosnipataAndes to Amazon transect

    Publishing your photos?
    Maja Sundqvist, a post doc at SLU in Umeå, Sweden is writing a review on Community And Ecosystem Responses To Elevational Gradients: Processes, Mechanisms, And Insights For Global Change to be submitted to Annual Reviews in Ecology, Evolution and Systematics early 2013.
    She would like to include photos from a low, mid and high elevational site from our Andean transect in one of her figures. Would anyone have nice photos to contribute to her paper? If so, please send to Maja.Sundqvist@slu.se (please add the photos to GEM, too!).

    Thank you,
    Cécile

People

  • Thumb_malhi_pic_forest

    Yadvinder Malhi

    I am Professor of Ecosystem Science at Oxford University.
    I lead the Ecosystems Programme at the Environmental Change Institute, with a focus of understanding the functioning of tropical forests and...

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    Georgia Pickavance

    I am a Database Assistant, supporting the tropical forest database ForestPlots.net and associated research projects RAINFOR, Afritron and T-FORCES. I am studying for a Masters in GIS alongside my research...

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    Gregory Asner

    no details
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    Cécile Girardin

    I coordinate carbon cycling data for the GEM network. I am an ecosystems scientist focussing on carbon dynamics of tropical forest ecosystems. Following my PhD at Oxford University School of...

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    Greg Goldsmith

    I am a tropical plant physiological ecologist with a particular interest in plant-water relations. My doctoral research, based at the University of California, Berkeley, focused on the impacts of drought...

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    Sandra Diaz

    no details
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    Norma Salinas

    I am a postdoctoral research assistant at the University of Oxford. I am working with plant traits along altitudinal gradients in tropical forests. My research involve many aspects of tropical...

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    Oliver Phillips

    My long-term research goal is to understand the dynamics of carbon and biodiversity across the world’s tropical forests, how these change with our changing climate, and how they may feedback...

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